Boxes: endless fun!

We all know that children would prefer to play with the boxes than the toys they get. Since Christmas is coming up, this is a good reminder to keep it simple.

For Toddler Music & Movement and Toddler Art, we explored the world of BOXES. Toddlers started by making art by creating a collage with shapes cut from old boxes. Once the toddlers were done, I gave them paint and they painted  their abstract bas-relief collage. It was interesting to see them use the different colors to paint each shape they had glued. As the painting progressed more mixing of the colors happened.

boxes1 boxes2There are so many ways boxes can be used in art projects. You can use an open box and make a marble roll in paint or roll up the cardboard and use it to stamp a rose-like on a paper.

Mr. Josh and I made tunnels with big boxes and streamers (carwash effect) for toddlers to go through to get in the theatre for Toddler Music & Movement. That was an awesome transition into his part of the hour on boxes. He had different kinds of boxes (plastic, wood and cardboard) as well as different sizes. When Toddler Music and Movement was done, toddlers got to continue their exploration of boxes. We had setup and “invitation to play” right outside the theatre with empty boxes that could be use to stack up, line up… and more tunnel boxes! Toddlers had a blast!
boxesplay1 boxesplay2 boxesplay3 boxesplay4 boxesplay5

This was our first time using the theme of boxes. I came across the idea on Storytime Katie’s webpage. We adapted it to fit our needs, but it was a great resource.

Creative Lab

Our first Creative Lab was amazing! Exactly like I thought it would happen. There were 15 kids ranging form the age of 5 to 10. The younger ones were helped by their parents, the older ones worked on their own. This first Creative Lab was about construction. We talked about architects and how they design buildings & towers; what they have to think of when building (a safe base, the height, the aesthetics…). Children were given recyled objects to create a tower. They had to make it as tall as they could (not a competition). They could work in teams or alone and they couldn’t use glue. We had duct tape that they could use.

Davis, age 7, made the tallest tower in his age group. He also worked alone.
His tower was taller than him, once placed on the floor.
It was an impressive construction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the kids decided to focus on the base and never really had time to build up their towers. Others focused on the symetrical aspect of their towers. Three 10 years old boys teamed up and made the tallest tower. At the end, they added one element which made the tower tip over. They tried to fix it, but it never really stand the same afterwards.

 

The tallest Tower! We measured it before it collapsed, it was 7′ 7″ !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kimberly, age 5, build a “house” from styrofoam.