Monoprints… again

I’m addicted to printmaking and monoprints. I always try to find a way to include some kind of printmaking in to my art class. I introduced the kids in Art Club to a type of monoprint I did at UF during my summer semester. You roll ink on a slab or non-porous table top, place a piece of paper on top (without pressing down!) and draw on it. Where ever the pressure is, the ink will transfer on to your piece of paper. For example, if you us a stamps, it will make a mark on the paper where the ink is.

After they are done drawing, they lift up their paper and see their image. We did this a few months ago and again for Valentine’s Day. These images are from a few months ago when we did it on plain white paper.

monoprint monoprint2 monoprint3 monoprint4

I used Speedball Block Printing ink (waterbase) and a brayer. Rolled ink in front of each kids, place a piece of paper (I used white construction paper) and pencils to draw.

 

I’m scared!

As part as the Summer Reading Program theme, we did a storytime called “things that go bump in the night”.  Most of the books talked about noises that we hear at night that might scare us. So, for art time, I decided to do a fun project about being scared! I had preschoolers, ages 3 to 5 and I showed them how to draw a face that would look “scared”. The first think I did was to ask them to show me what they look like when they are scared or surprised (when you’re not expecting something, it can surprise you and scare you).

I ask them to draw a scared face with markers. starting with the outline of a face, big eyes with pupil in the middle, arched eyebrows and a big open mouth. They could add other elements afterwards (nose, ears, neck…)

 

  Using a straw, kids dropped a drop of diluted tempera paint on the hair-line and blew the paint, to give the impression of hair standing on their head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Rosemary standing proud next to her project! She will be 3 years old next month.

 

 

 

 

 

This project was easy enough and parents only guided their child through the process.
It is a great project for all ages.

Supplies:
– tempera paint (diluted ~ 3/4 paint, 1/4 water)
– white paper
– markers
– straws
– containers for paint