Turkeys

Every year we paint turkeys for Thanksgiving. It’s always a fun project and I’ve always been pleased with the results.

I can’t stand the turkey hands! So, I came up with a project that would allow kids to make turkeys on their own, that would look unique.
I call it: “Crazy Turkeys” or “a Turkey Mess”.
It’s pretty easy… I give the kids brown paint and feathers, a beak, a waddle and googely eyes (of course!). I have images of turkeys on the wall and we talk about the shape of the turkey body, neck (long or short?) and head. The younger ones (3 and under) usually make a “turkey mess”. which consists of a blob of brown paint with feathers on top and the beak, waddle and eyes spread a little bit everywhere. It’s funny and kids love it!

Preschoolers and older kids usually will take their time and get the shape right and paint a brown turkey, use the feathers for wings of the tail, place the beak, waddle and eyes on the head… sometimes even add extra things around their turkey.

Today was the first time, that even though I mentioned how the turkeys looked, kids painted their hands and stamped it on their paper. In both classes, Toddler Art & Family Art! I was not expecting that! Or the fact that the kids wanted to do it, not the parents. It seems like they learn it in school (or daycare) and they automatically go for that easy symbol instead of trying their own. Some of the kids saw they others do their hand print and by the end of the class, more than half the class had stamped turkeys on their paper or asked for a different piece of paper.

Little Owls, Little Owls

Storytime this week is about owls.  Such a fun subject for art. Owls, unlike other birds have a few distictive features that makes them easy to recognize. As long as you give the kids the right supplies to make them.

I put this picture of an owl on the board, so we could look at it and I dentify a few key elements. owl_picture

 

 

 

 

 

Owls have “ears
Owls have BIG eyes
Owls’ heads and bodies seem like one body part.

Toddler Art Owls

Toddler Art

 

For Toddler Art, I cut ovals from an old book. I handed each child one and asked them to paint it with brown and orange paint on their table. Once they had painted their oval, I gave them a yellow triangle for the beak and 2 styrofoam egg cups for the eyes. They glued these on their oval to make it look like an owl.

 

 

As for Family Art Time, we made our owls from old toilet paper rolls. I used the brown ones, which helped with the color scheme we had. Again, using brown and orange paint, participants painted their tubes. First, parents help push down the top of the roll to create ears. They also helped the younger ones with cutting wings from scrap paper (brown construction paper as well as old book pages). Children also had access to feathers. Googly eyes to finish it off.

 

 

Family Art Time / toilet paper roll owls

Family Art Time / toilet paper roll owls

 

 

Printmaking at the Library

This week we explored two different kinds of printmaking: monoprints & collagraph.

Preschool Project (3-5 year olds) is back this week! Ms. Laura decided to do a nighttime storytime to kick off the “Dream Big Read” summer reading theme. To follow this theme, I decided to do a fun project, something most kids don’t get to do at home. We made monoprints. We also worked backwards by starting with a slab of paint and children removing the paint with paintbrushes & palette knives. I used black & blue tempera paint and with a brayer I rolled the paint directly on the table (which kids just think it’s sooo cool!). Children then used the palette knives and paintbrushes and started moving the paint around, removing some of it.

Once they were done, we placed a piece of paper on top and the rubbed it to transfer the paint from the table onto the paper.
Keep in mind that our tables are made of laminate, which is non-porous and easy to wash. If you’d like you can use acrylic sheets or cookie baking sheet.

For Toddler Art we made a collagraph, which is a collage & printmaking mixed together. I used old cardstock flyers, but you can use any kind of material to create your collage. As long as it’s thicker than paper, it will work.
Toddlers cut and glued the pieces on to a bigger one. Once they were finished, they cam to me and I applied the ink over it and they use a baren to transfer the ink from their collage to the piece of paper. The results were fun and amazing.


Rosemary, age 3 cutting and creating her collage. Mom is watching and assisting with gluing and some cutting.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Levi, age 2, showing off his collage.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Connor, age 3, with mom helping him to use the scissors and cut the cardstock.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rosemary, age 3, using a baren to transfer the ink from her collage to the paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Levi, age 2, rubbing the paper, making a print

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Printmaking is not used often with younger children. Parents don’t always know what is printmaking or think it’s a technique for older children or adults. I don’t believe there’s an age to learn to have fun with art and stepping outside our comfort zone.

Art @ the Beach

This week’s theme is “Beach”.
Miss Stephanie created a fun storytime around this theme; reading 3 books, songs and a sorting activity for toddlers and preschoolers.

For art time, we used colored sand and glue and created a fun abstract art for the toddlers, and a little bit more involved for the preschoolers.

In Toddler Art, we used Elmer’s glue and glue stick, adding the glue on our paper and pourring the sand on top. Adding more glue and pourring a new color sand.

In Family Art, we used oil pastels as well. Children started by drawing a picture of the beach, then adding sand to some areas. Their creation was a little bit more involve and defined compared to the toddlers.